Tag Archives: terrorism

They say that life is what happens while you’re making other plans; I say that stuff is what happens while you’re just trying to live your life.

I might suppose that I owe my readers an apology for not having posted for over six months, but one thing about anonymous blogging is that you don’t really have a relationship with your readers, and apologies are for relationships.

But in case I’m wrong about that, I do apologize, and I’ll just say that a lot of stuff has come between me and blogging since last March. Nothing to write home about—just stuff.

But by the same token, it hasn’t seemed to me that there has been much new stuff going on with regard to Israel and its relations with the world, which is what I write about here. Not that there hasn’t been anything going on—just nothing strikingly new.

But maybe it’s all right to just keep reminding the world of what is going on.

The official IDF blog says that September was a busy month, with the usual rocket attacks and cross-border raids. But what nation should be expected to regard these kinds of things as normal?!

World media continue to do stupid little things like trying to deny Israel the right to designate its own Capital. And even the Democratic Party of the United States got in on the act last month, though I now read that they’ve reconsidered their inanity.

The big news this past week has been of course Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu’s UN speech, replete with a cartoon drawing of a bomb, as if to drive home the point that the world (or at least the UN) needs to be addressed at a level of less than adult intelligence in order to get the point across that Iran must be stopped. By way of contrast, the UN tirade by Palestinian Authority Chairman Mahmoud Abbas served mostly to call attention to his increasing irrelevance.

Also increasingly irrelevant are the Gaza “flotillas.” The latest one is reportedly somewhere in Italy and appears to be generating not much more than a collective yawn. Maybe I shouldn’t be too hard on myself for thinking there hasn’t been much to write about.

On the positive side, my co-laborers in promulgating the truth have continued to publish articles here and there laying out the facts of Mideast life, like this one from Front Page Magazine explaining in great detail why it is a lie to claim that Jewish settlers  are living on land stolen from Palestinian Arabs.

Or check out this video series from Zola Levitt Ministries on eight reasons why you need to support Israel. Yes — you.

 

TTYL.

lineman

Comments Off on They say that life is what happens while you’re making other plans; I say that stuff is what happens while you’re just trying to live your life.

Filed under News snippets, Perspectives

Ah well, back to the down & dirty.

GIYUS definitely belongs on my list of truth lovers (and I hope to call your attention to more as time allows), but they get special treatment, being the group that keeps sending me the lists of nasties to act on.  Here is the most recent:

Help Israel and the IDF win the next fight with the Flotilla

 

In the year that passed since the terror organization IHH tried to "break the siege" on Gaza while attacking IDF Navy soldiers, the Turkish group has been plotting a rerun of the event. This time around, IHH plans to have many more ships from all over the world all trying to set sail into Gaza.

There is no humanitarian crisis in Gaza and Israel delivers all goods through regular channels. If the flotilla was about delivering aid to Gaza Israel would gladly accept the aid and deliver it to the people in Gaza. But this flotilla is not about aid – it’s about hate towards Israel and about trying to create a provocation against Israel. It’s about denying Israel’s right to exist as a Jewish state.

Jewish leaders across the world are pressuring European countries not to allow Flotilla ships to set sail. That pressure seems to be working as the French Flotilla group announced their ship will not sail to Gaza. Even Turkish Foreign Minister acknowledged that in light of the newly opened Rafah crossing the flotilla is not necessary and  urged the flotilla organizers to reconsider. The Turkish IHH group is scheduled to announce their decision within a few days.

While we hope the next flotilla will indeed be smaller, this is an ongoing battle. The battle field is online and social media is the weapon of choice.

If you’d like to help Israel in this time of terrorists provocations and help avoid the next attack on Israel please take a few minutes to look at the individuals listed below. These people are the global support base of the Flotilla movement. Giyus.org took the time to identify those that raise funds for flotilla activities, support terror organizations like IHH and Hamas and blindly act against Israel no matter what. They use their Facebook accounts to spread heir hateful anti Israel message.

These are the faces of the new web 2.0 antisemitism – please log into your facebook account and report these users for abusing Facebook to spread hate and antisemitism.

Click on each NAME link to reach the relevant facebook profile to report. Click on the report link on the bottom left hand side of the profile page. When you click on the report link a small window opens up. Please choose the "Inappropriate profile information" option and then choose the 2nd option in the drop down menu – "contains hate speech".

Time is of the essence here – the more complaints Facebook receives the more they’ll look into the issue and make it harder for these people to spread their anti Israel hate message.

Thank you for your support and for standing up and saying no to hate and antisemitism. To act on more issues and easily support Israel please sign up to our email updates – make a difference to Israel.

Greta berlin.jpg

Greta Berlin

Paul

Paul Larudee

Osama

Osama Alisawa

Adam

Adam Shapiro

Kevin

Kevin Ovenden

Amin

Amin Abou Rashed

Gharbi

Gharbi Anouar

Joe

Joe Catron

Dina

Dina Kennedy

Benji

Benji de Levie

Gail

Gail Coleman

Richard

Richard Reilly

Felice

Felice Gelman

Kevin2

Kevin Clark

Mary

Mary Hughes Thompson

Picot

Aymeric Picot

Nina

Nina Nervestad

Ronny

Ronny Kjelsberg

Georg

Georg Morland

Espen

Espen Goffeng

Thomas

Thomas Lie-Gjedldslett

Dror

Dror Feiler

Ali

Ali Awaisi

Greta

Griet Deknopper

Fatima

Fatima Elmo

Niamh

Niamh Moloughney

Fintan

Fintan Lane

Shawn

Shane Cormac Dillon

Fop

Fop Beal Feirste

John

John Hurson

Leti

Leti Moskis

Maria

Maria del Mar

Laura

Laura Arau

Ehib

Ehab Lotayef

Sandra

Sandra Ruch

Viviene

Vivienne Porzsolt

Raul

Raul Bassi

Andrew

Andrew Muncie

Comments Off on Ah well, back to the down & dirty.

Filed under From my mailbox, World against Israel

PA murders another Israeli citizen; US taxpayers continue to foot the bill.

The Honorable Xxxx Xxxxxx

United States House of Representatives

XXXX Longworth HOB

Washington, DC 20515

Dear Mr. Xxxxxx,

I wrote to you last month asking you what you were going to do to immediately remove the U.S. financial support of the Palestinian Authority.

Since the murder of the Fogel family in Israel, a second event has occurred directly involving PA policemen in the murder of an Israeli citizen.

I find it unconscionable as an American citizen that we are paying to support terrorist activities overseas.

Please, Mr. Xxxxxx, what are you doing about this?

110426_josephtomb Last month the Palestinian Authority was implicated in the murder of five Israelis, including a three month old infant. This week we find that the Palestinian Authority police directly fired on several Israeli citizens, killing one.

And a Palestinian Authority spokesman says, in effect, ‘we owe no apology—they needed killing.’

And the United States continues its financial support of the Palestinian Authority.

So doesn’t this make us accessories to murder? Do we have a legal excuse because we don’t mean to be supporting killers, it just works out that way? I wrote my Congressman a second time today to ask what he’s doing to correct this situation. Have you written to your Representative yet?

Talk to y’all later; I’ve got a letter to mail.

Comments Off on PA murders another Israeli citizen; US taxpayers continue to foot the bill.

Filed under News snippets, U.S. against Israel

East is East and West is West…

…and never the twain shall meet? Well, hardly ever.

Yesterday I cross-posted a comment from a prominent leader pointing out that Israel is not the only democracy in the Middle East.

Right away I was presented with a couple of qualifications to that statement:

1) Israel is not the only democracy in the Middle East but it is the only stable, reliable, credible, capable, predictable, democratic and non-conditional ally of the USA in the area.

2) Israel is the only Western and pro-Western democracy from the eastern Mediterranean around to Australia.

Let’s bear that in mind.

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

And not to muddy the waters, but the waters sure are getting muddy around here. The murder last week of Hamas lackey peace activist Vittorio Arrigoni called to attention the complexity of relationships between terrorists. It seems that terror organizations like Hamas have even more radical terror organizations nipping at their heels. An item in The Media Line details some of the problems super-fundamentalists known as Salafis are causing for Hamas in Gaza, as well as for the governments of Jordan and Saudi Arabia.

And honor among thieves? Don’t even go there.

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

Further complicating matters (but in a good way) is a recent poll showing that Palestinian Arabs are getting tired of the killing. According to the Palestinian journalism and research organization JMCC, the number of Palestinians who support military operations against Israelis went from about one half to one third between January 2009 and April of this year. That still leaves a lot of war mongers, but it’s a big step in the right direction.

It’s also consistent with numerous findings that Israeli Arabs would much rather remain Israeli Arabs than come under the authority of a Palestinian state, thank you very much.

Maybe if the Salafis and Wahhabis and Hamas can all wipe each other out, we can then have some peace. That may well be too much to ask, but there’s no harm in asking, right?

TTYL,

lineman

rodneystackbuddies 

PS: Thanks, Rodney, for the pic!

Comments Off on East is East and West is West…

Filed under News snippets

I just wrote my Congressman to defund the PA. Now it’s your turn.

At last, something we can do, not just talk about.

Talk is cheap. I’ve been doing a lot of talking in this blog, and yes, it’s a free blog. But I’ve also found something I can do: put pressure on the US Congress to defund the Palestinian Authority.

In the wake of the recent murders of the Fogel family, and the arrests of officers of the Palestinian Authority in the ongoing investigation, the error of The US funding of that organization and its security apparatus has become more glaring than ever. Not that our funding has suddenly become an error, but the error has been brought into high relief by the murders.

I often quote Caroline Glick in this blog, and I hope she doesn’t mind if I do it again. In one of her recent columns she points out:

…following the Palestinian massacre of the Fogel family, [Israeli Prime Minister] Netanyahu highlighted the fact that the PA routinely glorifies terrorist murderers and pays them and their families handsome pensions for their illegal acts of war. He also highlighted the genocidal anti-Jewish incitement endemic in Palestinian society.

While all of this is useful, talk is cheap. It is time to make the Palestinians pay a price for their depravity and to put their international supporters on the defensive.

Specifically, Netanyahu should ask the US to cut off all US economic and military assistance to the PA. Two PA intelligence officers were arrested as part of the Fogel murder investigation.

The US is training and equipping the Palestinian intelligence services. This should stop.

Two days after the massacre in Itamar, the PA dedicated a public square in El-Bireh to terror commander Dalal Mughrabi. Mughrabi commanded the 1978 bus attack on the coastal highway in which 37 Israelis – including 12 children – were murdered. The PA previously named a street, a dormitory, a summer camp and a sports tournament after her. Several popular songs have been written to glorify her crimes.

The US is underwriting the PA’s budget. This should stop.

Were the government to go after international aid to the PA, not only would it begin a debate in the US and perhaps Europe about the nature of Fatah specifically and Palestinian society generally, it would force the Palestinians’ myriad supporters to justify their support for a society that is defined by its goal of annihilating Israel.

So as just one US citizen, I can do something to begin putting pressure on the US Congress. And I just did. Now it’s your turn.

Comments Off on I just wrote my Congressman to defund the PA. Now it’s your turn.

Filed under U.S. against Israel, World against Israel

Oh thank heaven for 2011!

2010 was a rough one, wasn’t it? Wars and rumors of wars, earthquakes in divers places… but still the end is not yet. Don’t worry, it’s not my intention here to do a year-in-review-and-preview-of-the-new post. If you think about it for a moment, changing one digit on the calendar really doesn’t change anything, does it? The wars and rumors of wars that were going on a few months ago are still going on now; there was another major earthquake in another part of the world yesterday. Things happen; things continue to happen.

One of the major things that happened last year which seems to be still with us is the way the Stuxnet computer super virus appears to have stymied Iran’s nuclear arms program. Every time I think the matter has been finally dealt with, it turns up again. And now Jerusalem Post and others say it was actually the Middle East Story of the Year for 2010. But I said I wasn’t going to do that sort of post. So I won’t. I just thought it was interesting to note.

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

Well, OK, even though I don’t intend to indulge, it doesn’t hurt to pay attention to the comments of others who have better credentials than do I. Once again Caroline Glick comes to mind, and she has some cogent remarks to make about what she calls “The wars of 2011.”

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

sweet_little_hamas_suicide_boy_via_ICEJ Speaking of credentials, IsraeliGirl sent me another in-depth expert interview, this time with counter terrorism authority Dr. Boaz Ganor of IDC Herzliyah. Dr. Ganor answers some questions I had, such as how Iran’s Shiite terror organization manages to work so well with Sunni Hamas in spite of what would otherwise be fatal differences. An intriguing, if upsetting, perspective also is how suicide bombers constitute what might be called the terrorists’ “’smart bomb’ technology.” Talk about culture shock — there’s nothing in the culture I come from that can easily handle the notion of suicide being smart, but that only shows how much we need to learn about the nasty world existing in some others’ minds. And it is apparently not all about the “70 virgins” either, but it’s even more bizarre (to our way of thinking) than that. Read Dr. Ganor’s explanations here.

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

And this morning I received an article from the same source explaining Iran’s (or at least Ahmadinejad’s) vision of a new world order to replace the failed [sic] old orders of communism and capitalism. Apparently the tyrant of Tehran thinks

Iran and its ideological teachings are emerging as the next major alternative to these ideologies…

…and that the new world can get along just fine without either the US or Israel.

His plans for the Arab states also apparently involve their moving away from any semblance of moderation into his loving yet crushing grip. It’s no wonder (and a relief, in a way) that the recent Wikileaks revelations show the Arab regimes to be more wary of Iran than of the US or even of Israel.

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

changing_weather You know, I’m a little tempted at this point to say, the more things seem to change, the more they stay the same. But I’m not completely certain how long things will be that way. I’m ninety-nine and forty-four one hundredths percent sure that we will all wake up tomorrow, but beyond that…?

Talk to y’all later, Good Lord willin’ and the crick don’t rise.

Comments Off on Oh thank heaven for 2011!

Filed under News snippets, Perspectives

Not-so-simple Syria, and taking back Iran, one gas pump at a time.

My correspondent over at Giyus.org continues to provide beneath-the-surface insights on Middle Eastern matters. The latest two include another expert interview, and some aspects of life inside Iran that we don’t often hear about.

In the first item, a Tel Aviv university professor analyzes Syria’s recent history and current standing as a pivot point between Iran, Lebanon, and terrorist interests in the region. He also provides the first answer I’ve seen as to how the secular regime in Syria is able to stay (more or less) on the same page with the ultra-Islamists in Iran.

Here is a cross-post of the interview in its entirety:

220px-Syrian_soldier_aims_an_AK-47 Focus on Syria – using terror for political gains in the Middle East

In the complicated realm of the Middle East, Syria plays a central role. Giyus.org sat down with Professor Eyal Zisser, an expert on the modern history of Syria and Lebanon, to get a better understanding of Syria and the way it uses terror to advance its political goals in the region. Prof. Zisser is the head the department of Humanities Studies in Tel Aviv University; he is a frequent speaker and writer on this subject.

Giyus.org: What’s Syria role in the region and how is it impacted by the rising power of Iran?

Professor Zisser: Syria has a central role in the Middle East. First of all, it has a central geographic location practically at the heart of the region. Secondly, Syria borders Israel and plays a major part in the Arab-Israeli conflict. Its conflict with Israel allows Syria to maintain close relationship with Hamas and Hezbollah and help them out.

The Assad family has been in power since 1970. During this period Syria became a stable country, strong from the military and political perspective. Syria is involved in Lebanon and with the Palestinians, but most of the attention it gets from the Western world is due to its close ties with Iran.

This Syria-Iran alliance allows Iran to benefit from Syria’s central location and provides a gateway for Iran to Israel’s immediate vicinity. Syria, on the other hand, benefit from the rising power of Iran. By partnering with Iran, Syria seems stronger in the eyes of the West.

Giyus.org: Iran is ruled by a deeply religious Islamic regime, while Syria is completely secular – does that impact the relations between the states?

Professor Zisser: At the moment the political gains for both countries outweighs the religious differences. In the long term this is definitely an issue that can cause tension between Syria and Iran. However, since this alliance was forged 30 years ago, both countries have dealt with much greater threats to their existence so it is in their best interests to partner and over look the religious issue.

Giyus.org: What are some of the major threats facing Syria in recent years?

Professor Zisser: The list is very long. In the 80s Israel entered Lebanon in the first Lebanon war. This then created problems in Lebanon, the front yard of Syria. This last decade since September 11th attacks was marked by the war on Terror. Bush invaded Iraq and was considering an invasion to Syria as well.

In light of these threats Syria needs Iran as an ally to back her up. In the eyes of Syria, Israel and the US are a strategic threat, much more so than Iran.

Giyus.org:  What are the motivations behind Syria’s support of terror organizations like Hamas and Hezbollah?

Professor Zisser: Syria views terror as a tool to achieve its political goals. Syria does not have a strong army and is using its terror support to show its presence and make the West take it into account as a major player in the Middle East.

On top of that, by supporting terror organizations Syria is keeping radical Islamic terror at bay. Bashar al Assad said that radical Islam is a great threat for Syria since it is a secular regime. By supporting anti Israel terror organizations like Hamas and Hezbollah, Syria stays on the "right side" of Islamic terror organizations like Al Qaeda.

And of course, by supporting Hamas and Hezbollah, Syria gains popularity in the Arab street as the main backer of the resistance forces against Israel.

Giyus.org:   Moving from supporting terror to peace – what’s Syria strategic stand with regards to the peace process with Israel?

Professor Zisser: Syria would like to see the peace talks move forward but is not willing to take any actions as condition for the talks. Syria refuses to stop supporting terror as a condition to resuming the peace talks. If and when there will be peace talks Syria might be willing to discuss its terror activities.

However, when we think of a possible peace agreement between Syria and Israel, it will be more like a friendly divorce agreement than a unity in a marriage. There is too much suspicion on both sides for this to be a warm close peaceful relation. But there can be a lasting peace where each country minds its own business.

Giyus.org: How does Syria view the efforts by the US and the European Union to bring it closer to the West?

Professor Zisser: There is actually a great disappointment in Syria from the Obama administration. Syria expected Obama to start talks and advance the relationship but this didn’t happen.  Despite the rhetoric about engaging Syria, there is still no US Ambassador in Damascus (the last US Ambassador left in 2005 after the assassination of PM Harriri in Lebanon).

The US on the other hand demands that Syria make some changes that demonstrate they are heading for peace. The US would like to see Syria sending Hamas’ leader Mashaal away from Damascus, or stop assisting anti American terror in Iraq. Syria refusal to take these steps makes it very hard for the US to make real advances.

As for the European Union, while they can offer some benefits, Syria does not view them as a strategic partner.

Since these advancements from the EU came with no conditions, it only convinces Syria that supporting terror organizations pays out. They believe that they can convince the world to accept them as they are, as long as they stick to their guns and continue supporting terror activities.

Giyus.org:  How does Syria view its relations with Lebanon?

Professor Zisser:  Lebanon is very important to Syria which views it as its own front yard.  While they were kicked out of Lebanon a few years ago, they are now gradually increasing their involvement again.

Lebanon is a highly fractured country and Syria is the only one that can keep the balance and help maintain stability. Since this is in everyone best interests and no one wants to see Lebanon torn apart in a civil war again, Syria has been allowed back in the game.

Syria is willing to meddle in the Lebanese swamp and is the only one that can keep Hezbollah in its place. Hezbollah’s weapon route from Iran goes through Syria. This gives Syria great leverage over Hezbollah since they can cut off their weapon supply at any time.

Giyus.org:  Will there be any impact to the expected UN tribunal announcement regarding Hezbollah’s involvement in the assassination of Harriri?

Professor Zisser:  No one has an interest to burst the Lebanese bubble. Not the US, or France, which were behind the tribunal in the first place, nor the regional Lebanese players which know their power limitation.

The main question is if Hezbollah is willing to accept an indictment. It’s clear that even if there is a report accusing Hezbollah of involvement in the assassination, nothing will be done about it. But at the moment Hezbollah is not willing to accept any report claiming the organization or its people were involved.

It is not clear how far Hezbollah will go with its reaction on this issue but I don’t feel it will escalate to a new civil war. It’s much easier to bury a report by the UN and ignore it than to start a civil war over it.

Giyus.org:   What was Syria role in previous internal Lebanese conflicts such as Hezbollah’s coup in 2008?

Professor Zisser:  Until 2008 there was a strong anti Syria camp in Lebanon which included the Druze and Sunni and was backed by France and Saudi Arabia. When Hezbollah took over key areas in Beirut in 2008, as a reaction to an anti Hezbollah resolution in the government, the anti Syria camp was left alone in the field against the Shiite Hezbollah army.

Knowing their own power limitations, the anti Syria camp realized they cannot stand up to Syria alone. So they turned around and decided that Syria must be engaged again since they are the only ones that can maintain balance in Lebanon. The Druze and the Sunnis camps have made their peace with Syria, basically paving the road for Syria’s involvement in internal Lebanese politics once again.

Giyus.org: Syria is also bordering Turkey – how would you describe the relations between these two countries?

Professor Zisser:  Syria and Turkey enjoy close relations these days. They have strong economic ties and Turkish PM Erdoğan is a close ally. This was not always the case. In the past Syria and Turkey were enemies and Syria supported the Kurds anti Turkey terror activities. Since Syria stopped supporting the Kurds, the relations with Turkey have greatly improved. The recent Islamization process which Turkey is going through has also brought the two countries closer.

Giyus.org: Can you describe the daily life of the people in Syria?

Professor Zisser:  Syria is a totalitarian regime which is becoming more aggressive over the years. The hopes that Bashar al Assad, as a young leader, would bring about change have faded.

In the Middle East, before you seek the right to speak your mind, you seek the right to walk safely in your street. Take a look at Iraq, at Lebanon, personal safety is not granted. The people in Syria know very well where they live and realizing the alternative is chaos, therefore they stick with their dictator regime to gain stability and safety. It’s a choice between two evils – a tyrant regime or chaos in the streets.

Giyus.org: What keeps Assad’s regime in power? Why doesn’t it collapse like the Soviet Union?

Professor Zisser:  There is no real opposition to the Assad regime. Most people are very passive and there are no demonstrations against the ruling party. Assad power base relies on this passiveness and the fact that it brings stability. Of course the security forces play an important role as well.

Assad’s anti Western and anti Israel rhetoric is also very popular in the Syrian street. This unites the people in Syria against Israel and the West further strengthening Assad’s control.

From an economic perspective things have been rather good so again no cause for people to make a change.

This is an ethnic family based regime, similar in concept to the regime of Castro in Cuba or North Korea.

Other than Israel, there are no democracies in the Middle East – it’s all dictatorships which last a long time. The only dictator that lost power is Saddam Hussien and if September 11th attacks didn’t happen Saddam would probably still rule over Iraq.

Assad keeps a tight ship, and Syria has been stable throughout the years. While so many changes have happened in Israel or the US, Syria has shown remarkable stability and this stability is at the base of their power.

*** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** *** ***

Another report from behind closed doors in Iran provides further insight on how internal pressures continue to be more strongly felt (and feared) by the regime than we may currently realize.

Here also in its entirety is IsraeliGirl’s message:

Green_Arch Staple prices rise in Iran and the regime cracks up on opposition

Things in Iran have been difficult enough. But as sanctions bite, the regime is now forced to raise prices on basic staples. As the regime is well aware, the most potent challenge to Iran’s ruling system may be as simple as a shopping list.

Iranians – both rich and poor – have long benefited from blanket subsidies on natural gas, electricity, petrol, water and many staple foods. As sanctions target Iran’s limited refining capabilities, Iran was recently forced to import refined fuel, despite owning one of the world’s biggest oil reserves. As a result most drivers expect a rise of 400% in gasoline prices creating immense pressure at petrol stations across the country.

In the food department, bread prices are up more than fivefold, cooking oil more than double, cuts of lamb about triple from last year.

Price supports have long buoyed Iranians, with average households receiving $4,000 worth of fuel and electricity payments a year. Taking these benefits away can shake up the regime’s stronghold significantly.

Although the government promised payout to low income families to soften the impact of higher prices, Ahmadinejad threatens that any problems will be the fault of criminals and “economic seditionists” – the government’s opponents at home and abroad who want to bring him down.

In anticipation of unrest and protests, the Iranian regime has cranked up the pressure on human rights activists, political activists, students and leaders of the Green Movement.

This week, the Iranian regime arrested a large number of students and journalists, blocked websites (including the website of former president Mohammad Khatami, one of the leaders of the Green Movement), attempted to prevent meetings between the heads of the Green Movement and increased security measures in the streets of Tehran and other cities in preparation for the planned government subsidy reforms.

Giyus.org have learned increased measures have been taken against lawyers, specifically those representing political and human rights activists, student activists, foreign nationals detained in Iran, and juveniles sentenced to death.

The sad case of Nasrin Sotoudeh is a good example – the human rights lawyer was arrested on Sep. 4th. Sotoudeh, who was the attorney for Nobel Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi, represents human rights activists and juveniles facing the death penalty. Since her arrest, Sotoudeh has been held in solitary confinement and for some time has not been allowed family visits.

She faces charges of "acting against national security" and “congregation and collusion with intent to disrupt national security.”

The systematic actions of the Iranian regime against lawyers are in flagrant violation of the UN Basic Principles on the Role of Lawyers, which state that lawyers should be allowed to practice “without intimidation, hindrance, harassment or improper interference” and should be accorded freedom of speech.

So as the regime goes ahead with its economic plan the Iranian people will pay the price for the atrocities of the Ayatollahs or as Ahmadinejad recently warned:

“You have only one option: That’s recognizing the right and greatness of the Iranian nation,” Mr. Ahmadinejad said in a speech broadcast live on state television. “Should you choose this path, nations may forgive you … but if you want to continue the previous path of arrogance … these people (the Iranian nation) will pursue you until you end up in hell.”

Let’s hope the people in Iran will find the strength to take back their country.

Comments Off on Not-so-simple Syria, and taking back Iran, one gas pump at a time.

Filed under From my mailbox, Perspectives